Dehydration Symptoms

The human body is made up of about 75 percent water. Water is present in all your cells, in your bloodstream and even between the cells. Without it, your organs could not function properly. Keeping your body well hydrated helps both your body and your brain function at their peak. You lose water every day through normal bodily functions such as sweating, breathing, urinating and defecating. Under normal conditions, you replace the water by drinking when you are thirsty (the body’s signal that it needs more water) and eating. But, when that balance is upset and you lose more water than you take in each day, your body can quickly become dehydrated. Fortunately, your body will send you signals that it is dehydrated. Here’s what to look for.

Mild or Moderate Dehydration

Mild or moderate dehydration does not typically require medical attention unless you have a medical condition that puts you at a higher risk for serious complications from dehydration. If you are unsure if your medical condition requires special monitoring for dehydration, speak to your medical provider to be sure. Otherwise, mild or moderate dehydration is treated by increasing water intake and reducing causes of water loss, such as sweating, diarrhea or vomiting.

  • Thirst: Sudden increased thirst is often your body’s first signal that it needs more water.
  • Dry Mouth: A dry, parched or sticky mouth may develop soon after thirst if you do not increase your intake of water.
  • Decreased Urine Output: Without enough water, your kidneys cannot function as they should and will begin reducing the amount of water removed from the body resulting in less frequent urination.
  • Yellow Urine: Dark or yellow urine may be a sign that you are dehydrated, but bear in mind that some medications and vitamins can also cause yellow or dark urine. If the color of your urine suddenly appears darker than normal, it may be a sign you are dehydrated.
  • Headache: You may notice a mild to moderate headache if you are dehydrated.
  • Muscle Cramps or Fatigue: Feeling tired or experiencing muscle cramps is also common.

The human body is made up of about 75 percent water. Water is present in all your cells, in your bloodstream and even between the cells. Without it, your organs could not function properly. Keeping your body well hydrated helps both your body and your brain function at their peak.

Severe Dehydration

Severe dehydration requires medical intervention. If you experience these symptoms, seek medical advice. If left untreated severe dehydration can lead to seizures, kidney problems and even death.

  • Dizziness/ Fainting
  • Rapid Heartbeat
  • Confusion
  • Rapid Breathing
  • Lack of Energy or Sleepiness
  • Sunken Eyes (more common in babies)
  • Extreme Dry Skin
  • Inability to Urinate 

Although young children, babies and the elderly are more susceptible to dehydration, no one is immune. Anyone can get dehydrated if they lose more water than they take in. Keep your family well-hydrated for optimal health and to avoid the negative effects of dehydration. Contact Tyler Mountain Water today to keep your family hydrated.

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