Debunked: Hydration Myths

You’ve probably been told that everyone needs 8 glasses of water a day to stay hydrated. It might surprise you to learn that this is only partially true as your hydration needs are as individual as you are. Learn how to tell how much water you really need each day while exploring some other commonly-held myths about water and dehydration.

Everyone Needs 8 Glasses of Water a Day

How much water you need every day depends on your body size and your activity level. Generally, those who are larger require more water than someone with a smaller build. Likewise, those who engage in physical activity that causes them to sweat need to consume more fluids than someone who is sedentary. Weather also plays a role in your need for water. During the hot, humid days of summer, when your body naturally produces more sweat to keep you cool, most people need to consume more water than during cooler weather. The amount of water in the foods you eat also affects how much water you need. Under normal circumstances, healthy people can rely on their sense of thirst to let them know if they need more water. Older people whose sense of thirst may be diminished should consult their medical provider to determine the correct amount of water they need each day. The myth that you need 8 glasses of water a day has been debunked; in fact, no one is quite sure how it started in the first place.

Dark Urine Means You Are Dehydrated

While it is true that clear-colored urine typically indicates you are well-hydrated and your kidneys are functioning well and doing their job, dark or yellow urine is not necessarily a sign of dehydration. There are many reasons for dark urine, namely vitamins and medications that you may be taking. The amount of urine you produce is a better indicator of dehydration. If you notice decreased frequency in urinating, it may be an indicator that you need more fluids.

Caffeinated Beverages Don’t Count in Your Water Intake

You’ve probably been told that coffee and other caffeinated beverages work as diuretics and can’t be counted as fluid intake. While it is true that excess amounts of caffeine does work as a diuretic and rids your body of fluids, your morning cup of Joe isn’t likely to interfere with the fluid level in your body. The amount of water in coffee or tea absolutely counts in the volume of water you consume each day. Drinking moderate amounts of coffee or tea does not lead to dehydration.

How much water you need every day depends on your body size and your activity level. Generally, those who are larger require more water than someone with a smaller build. Likewise, those who engage in physical activity that causes them to sweat need to consume more fluids than someone who is sedentary.

You Can Never Drink Too Much Water

Many assume that because water is good for you that overconsumption never poses a risk to your health, but this really isn’t true. For people with some health conditions, too much water can be a major health risk, but overhydration can pose a risk to healthy individuals too. Consuming too much water can cause hyponatremia, a condition where the level of sodium in your blood drops extremely low. Because sodium helps to regulate the amount of water in and around your cell, a sudden drop in the sodium level in your blood can cause your cells to swell, a condition that can be life-threatening if not treated.

Stay hydrated by drinking when you are thirsty and enjoying a variety of beverages like freshwater and coffee or tea. Contact Tyler Mountain Water today to keep your family hydrated every day of the year.

Call Now ButtonGive Us a Call!